Anti-Racist Strategies, Memorial Day, Direct Action Against Transgender Detention & Reparations

Below were some articles circulating our discussion list last month.

Anti-Racist Organizing Strategies Panel, 5/9/2015 from Catalyst Project

Activists Block Road Outside Transgender Detention Center May 28, 2015 – Santa Ana, CA – Five LGBTQ and Immigrant rights leaders have taken over intersection of Flower and Civic Center, near the detention center in Santa Ana that holds transgender detainees, in a protest risking arrest to demand an immediate end to detention and deportation, starting with releasing undocumented transgender women.

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Person with brightly colored clothes, long black hair, orange cape with fist raised high and chains crossing chest, walks through intersection with police wearing helmets in background

The Worst Kind Of Groundhog Day: Let’s Talk (Again) About Diversity In Publishing

by Roxane Gay on CodeSwitch –Another day, another all-white list of recommended reading. This year’s New York Times summer reading list, compiled annually by Times literary critic Janet Maslin, offered up zero books by non-white authors. Gawker’s Jason Parham marveled that the list has achieved “peak caucasity” while Divya Guha and staff at Quartz offered an alternate reading list comprised of Indian writers.

And that’s what’s so frustrating about this list; this summer brings so many excellent books from writers of color, many of whom are very well known and have enthusiastic audiences — Balm by Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Loving Day by Mat Johnson, In the Country by Mia Alvar, Make Your Home Among Strangers by Jennine Capó Crucet, The Star Side of Bird Hill by Naomi Jackson, Only the Strong by Jabari Asim, Lovers on All Saint’s Day by Juan Gabriel Vasquez, Re: Jane by Patricia Park, Flood of Fire by Amitav Ghosh, and others — that it requires magical thinking to avoid an uncharitable reading of the NYT‘s picks.

Article from Zinn Education Project on the origins of Memorial Day, as founded by African-American residents of what remained of Charleston, South Carolina directly after the Civil War ended, 1865. By David W. Blight, 2011.

“The war was over, and Decoration Day had been founded by African Americans in a ritual of remembrance and consecration. The war, they had boldly announced, had been all about the triumph of their emancipation over a slaveholders’ republic, and not about state rights, defense of home, nor merely soldiers’ valor and sacrifice.”

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illustration by owen freeman -click image for artists website. black and white water color of people walking through what seems like ruins carrying flowers in their hands

40 Acres and a Mule Would Be at Least $6.4 Trillion Today—What the U.S. Really Owes Black America 

Slavery made America wealthy, and racist policies since have blocked African American wealth-building. Can we calculate the economic damage?
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